Aquamarine Sea Glass

A beautiful assortment of aquamarine sea glass that we collected from the beaches of Rincon, Puerto Rico.

The information we provide about sea glass colors is based on what we have learned from our own experiences of collecting sea glass in Puerto Rico. Much of the information about origin applies to sea glass found in the states and Canada as well.

Aquamarine Sea Glass

Aquamarine sea glass looks to be an extension of the sea itself. These sublime treasures evoke a soothing sense of bliss. Most will agree that something magical happens when blue and green meet and blend together. Found on the blue-green section of the color wheel these treasures range in quantities of green and quantities of blue. Like all sea glass there is a vast assortment of possible origins. Thicker and larger pieces of deep aquas and teals more than likely come from old glass insulators. Softer aquas may come from old Coca~Cola bottles or old mineral water bottles. The deeper aquas may also descend from old mineral water bottles. 

Turquoise blue sea glass that we found on the beaches of Rincon, Puerto Rico.

Turquoise Sea Glass

As we travel along the color wheel and come to the nirvanic world of the blue-greens we enter a more pristine paradise as we leave the realm of the mostly greens and enter the sublime world of the mostly blue. Turquoise sea glass is very rare and very coveted. Possible origins for these phenomenal treasures are old mineral water bottles, old decorative glass and Victorian era stained glass window panes.

In Puerto Rico much of the turquoise sea glass that is found is flat and embossed with patterns of old windows. These exquisitely rare treasures come from old Victorian era window panes that were used in casa criollas to filter and cool the Caribbean sunlight. These homes were built with wood, gorgeous tile floors and colorful glass windows. Many have been destroyed in hurricanes and many have been bulldozed to make room for more modern buildings. Debris left by storms and mankind is rarely hauled away and disposed of properly. It is either bulldozed away from the building site or hauled by dump truck a short distance off site and dumped illegally. Puerto Rico is very mountainous and the forces of erosion carries debris into rivers and streams that empty out to sea. Ocean washed debris from old houses is often found on the islands beaches.

Some of these houses still stand and can be seen on the island with colorful windows still intact. Sadly, many don't realize the value of the old tile floors, colorful windows or the exquisite hardwood ( termite resistant ) woodwork. These things could all be saved and incorporated into a new building. I have seen many of these old houses bulldozed down mercilessly. Puerto Rican turquoise sea glass from old glass windows whispers about the magic of the islands soul and has a lot to tell us.